Victories and achievements

March of Dimes is deeply proud of our uncommon record of success, which not only spans many decades but reflects our commitment to working with policymakers across the political spectrum.
Victories and Achievements

  • Ensured passage of two top legislative priorities: the Maternal Health Quality Improvement Act (H.R. 4387/S. 1675) and the Rural MOMS Act (H.R. 769/S. 1491) in the FY 22 Omnibus Appropriations bill. The budget also includes critical new investments for the following: Maternal and child health and development research programs; newborn screening; health workforce; expansion and enhancement of adult vaccination access; screening and treatment for mental depression; maternal mental health hotline; and substance abuse and mental health treatment for pregnant and postpartum women.
  • Advocated successfully for the passage of the Data Mapping to Save Moms Lives Act (H.R. 1218/S. 198) directing the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to include data on certain maternal health outcomes in its broadband health mapping tool.
  • The most significant achievement was the passage of the American Rescue Plan Act. The legislation included key March of Dimes’ priorities, most notably a new option allowing states to extend postpartum Medicaid coverage for up to 12 months for eligible moms and pregnant women. This policy is already making a positive impact for tens of thousands of at-risk women, especially Black moms, across the country.
  • On March 11, Congress approved the FY 22 Omnibus Appropriations bill. It included the Maternal Health Quality Improvement Act (H.R. 4387/S. 1675) and the Rural MOMS Act (H.R. 769/S. 1491), both top legislative priorities.  The budget also includes critical new investments for the following: Maternal and child health and development research programs; newborn screening; health workforce; expansion and enhancement of adult vaccination access; screening and treatment for mental depression; maternal mental health hotline; and substance abuse and mental health treatment for pregnant and postpartum women.
  • President Biden signed the Protecting Moms Who Served Act (S. 796) on November 30th. This bill requires the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to implement the maternity care coordination program. The VA must also provide community maternity care providers with training and support with respect to the unique needs of pregnant and postpartum veterans, particularly regarding mental and behavioral health conditions.

  • California’s Momnibus Act (S.B. 65) was signed into law on October 4th.  This innovative and comprehensive legislation reforms maternal and infant care in order to eliminate racial gaps in maternal and infant mortality and morbidity in California.  It was inspired by federal Momnibus (S.346/H.R.959) legislation.
  • Postpartum benefits were extended in GA, TX, NJ, VA and & others states guaranteeing momthers will maintain their Medicaid coverage for 12 months (extending the previous 60 day period) after the end of the pregnancy. This important step will help these states provide pregnancy-related care to preventing unnecessary postpartum-related illness and death.

  • March of Dimes played a critical role in ensuring Congress provided $2 million in 2017 for activities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to prevent preterm birth. March of Dimes also helped preserve funding for critical public health programs, such as newborn screening, immunizations, and the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant.
  • March of Dimes helped defeat proposals in both the U.S. House and Senate that would have undermined critical protections for women, children and families, like the requirements that all plans cover people with pre-existing conditions and include maternity coverage.
  • Across the nation, March of Dimes secured 207 state and local legislative and regulatory victories across a wide range of maternal and child health priorities, such as protecting Medicaid coverage for pregnant women, expanding life-saving newborn screening to more conditions, and restricting access to tobacco products.